About Taproot School

Taproot School is emergent curriculum driven, with the backbone of core standards being met in a project based way. We spend much of our time in the world doing, since we are also an experiential based school and because it is through experiences that we truly learn.

The main philosophy of Taproot is based on trust in the
kids. Kids know what they need and when we are nurturing, attentive and caring, we can see clearly exactly what they are reaching for and then help them find the tools to make it happen.

Focusing on the work we’ve come here to do; we care, learn, dig, dream, gather, explore, invite. We read together, measure each other’s wing span and help each other spell words we are just learning. We argue, push, shove, talk it out, understand. We be still together, be sad together, make meaning together and laugh and laugh. We rethink choices, challenge the kids to change the adults minds, challenge bias, create a culture of empathy, understanding and forgiveness.

Our kids are driven to learn, read, write, calculate, experiment, beat drums, run as fast and as far as they can and then come up for air and say; “I found it! I know why! I know how! I want to know more! Let’s go!” That is exactly the feeling inside this little school of ours. We could not do it any other way.

As I’ve said so many times before, “We make the road by walking.” Come take a walk with us. It is a magnificent trip.

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“We destroy the love of learning in children, which is so strong when they are small, by encouraging and compelling them to work for petty and contemptible rewards, gold stars, or papers marked 100 and tacked to the wall, or A’s on report cards, or honor rolls, or dean’s lists, or Phi Beta Kappa keys, in short, for the ignoble satisfaction of feeling that they are better than someone else.”

“We can best help children learn, not by deciding what we think they
should learn and thinking of ingenious ways to teach it to them, but by making the world, as far as we can, accessible to them, paying serious attention to what they do, and helping them explore the things they are most interested in.”

― John Holt